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September 2012

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Sep. 17th, 2012


racquathink

Graphics Software Help Center

Find answers to the top questions about graphics and graphics software. Lists a variety of help and technical support resources for graphics software including user discussion forums, bulletin boards, technical support documents, troubleshooting tips, newsgroups, and more.
For site issues such as pages that won't load, forum and chat problems, printing problems, and advertising issues, use the problem report form. For help with newsletters, discussion forums, broken links, reprint requests, and membership issues, visit the Help Center. 

for more info: http://graphicssoft.about.com/od/gethelp/Graphics_Software_Help_Center.htm 

Sep. 14th, 2012


racquathink

Loathe lowdown scareware scams? Lawsuit claims Speedy PC Pro is fraudulent software

http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/81388   

There are "scary" lawsuits and then there's scareware. SpeedyPC, which falsely claims to be a Microsoft Partner, has been named in a lawsuit for 'fraudulently inducing people to buy fraudulent software that supposedly speeds up and protects computers.'
By Ms. Smith on Wed, 09/12/12 - 8:26pm.
Print .
Browsing courthouse news can result in reading about "scary" allegations, lawsuits covering everything from people "wrongfully" arrested at a "haunted house" during a paranormal investigation, to a more serious class action lawsuit that, if true, clearly shows the company doesn't comprehend that gamers come in ages. Mosaic Sales Solutions, a sales company that "demonstrates Microsoft video game products," requires job applicants to "submit pictures of themselves and won't hire older candidates who do not 'reflect the Kinect and Xbox image.'" It supposedly favors "Generation Y" applicants, so anyone over age 40 stands no chance of being hired. However, it was the lawsuit about scareware that really caught my eye, because who knows how many tens of millions of people have been tricked by such cyber-scam software. Don't you just loathe lowdown scareware scammers?
You know the type of software that supposedly will help clean an infection from a PC or speed it up, that when downloaded, manages to come up with a huge list of malware infection threats or Windows registry errors that are not true. It "scares" the user into paying for the software to remove supposed threats. Scareware is especially offensive to me, promising to fix a problem that didn't usually exist in the first place. Too many people who really don't have a clue about security are duped into believing and paying for software that lied to acquire that customer. The FBI has repeatedly busted scareware distributors that have fleeced the frightened into paying out countless millions.
Under a sub-header called "Bogus," the Courthouse News Service reported:
Speedy PC Pro Software fraudulently induces people to buy fraudulent software that supposedly speeds up and protects computers, a class action claims in Federal Court.
The claims include [PDF] that after Speedy PC Pro's "free" scanner checked the plaintiff's computer, it found "thousands" of errors ranging from "viruses, malware and privacy threats" and buried the warning gauge needles into the red "critical" stages. It also warned her that "these problems were decreasing her computer's performance and compromising her security" and "urgently needed repair." She tried clicking "Fix All" but was told "SpeedyPC Pro detected some problems that need to be fixed," and was instructed to "Register SpeedyPC Pro now!" So she coughed up 40 bucks to find out it allegedly didn't work as advertised, and that the "free scan" gives everyone such "critical" and "urgent" errors. She is now suing SpeedyPC "for its practice of defrauding consumers."
The plaintiff's attorney points out other scareware scam lawsuits from SpeedyPC competitors, like "Symantec Corp and AVG Technologies" have alleged "similar claims related to the fraudulent design and marketing of so-called utility software products. Several of those cases have resulted in class-wide settlements and industry-shaping software modifications, which compel the implementation of far more transparent error detection and reporting procedure." But many such "reputable" firms have tried scareware tactics that are disgusting!

Sep. 5th, 2012


racquathink

iPhone Software Glitch Puts Users at Risk for Scams

http://news.terra.com/iphone-software-glitch-puts-users-at-risk-for-scams,b37e32a9dc459310VgnVCM5000009ccceb0aRCRD.html  

The software that powers Apple's popular iPhones may have a flaw that enables scammers to send users bogus messages asking for banking and other personal information.
The software glitch is said to allow scammers to send messages from impersonated accounts specifically to iPhone users. Because iPhones only display the "reply to" address of incoming text messages, iPhone users can potentially receive messages that look as though they're from friends or other trusted sources but are actually fraudulent, asking you to share passwords or to wire money.
The flaw was first noted by a security researcher who blogs under the name "pod2g." "The flaw (has) exist(ed) since the beginning of the implementation of SMS (text messages) in the iPhone, and is still there …" the researcher wrote.
Apple, meanwhile, urges customers to "be extremely careful" when receiving text messages, and recommends using its iMessage instant messaging service instead because it verifies the addresses of senders.
With business owners becoming increasingly dependent on their mobile devices for business communications, iPhone users should be on the lookout for any type of messages, including text, email, and messages over social media networks, that contain suspicious links or ask for personal information. Even if a link appears to be sent from someone you know, if it doesn't immediately appear legit, don't click on it. Contact the sender to find out what it is.
In addition to malicious links, some scammers will try "phishing,” which involves phony texts or emails that appear to have come from your bank asking to verify business or personal account numbers and passwords. If you receive a potentially suspicious message like this, contact your bank directly to alert them about it. While the message could be real, it might also be a sign that you've been hit by a scam. 

Aug. 25th, 2012


racquathink

NORTON SCIENTIFIC SCAM

http://nortonscientificreviews.blogspot.com/2012/04/norton-scientific-scam-detection-and.html 
Description - This is an advanced-level class that takes an in-depth examination of severe noncompliance, clinical data fabrication and falsification, scientific misconduct and fraud cases. The course focus is on developing skills for preventing fraud and misconduct and preparing clinical research professionals to better handle severe noncompliance.
Class Agenda/Modules - Instructors Make a Difference
Defining Clinical Research Fraud and Misconduct
Evaluation of Case History
R.E.S.E.A.R.C.H. TM Skills Program
Advanced Auditing and Monitoring Skills for Prevention
Case Development
Typical Class Attendee -
Sponsor Auditors
Contract Research Organization Auditors
Clinical Research Associates and Monitors
Institutional Review Board Internal Audi...

Jun. 14th, 2012


racquathink

Skechers to Pay $40M on FTC Charges

http://nortonscientificreviews.com/reviews/2012/06/skechers-to-pay-40m-on-ftc-charges/ 
Skechers USA has agreed to settle charges by the Federal Trade Commission for USD 40 million due to its claims that Shape-up shoes could help people tone muscles and lose weight. However, state and federal officials discovered that Shape-ups and other Skechers’ toning shoes are not living up to all the marketing hype.
“Skechers’ unfounded claims went beyond stronger and more toned muscles.  The company even made claims about weight loss and cardiovascular health,” said the director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection.
According to Norton Scientific Reviews report, aside from the Shape-ups line, Skechers have also made deceptive claims on its Tone-ups, Toners and Resistance Runner shoes.
The shape-up ads declaring that the shoes are made to tone muscles and promote weight loss, claims that the FTC says are unsupported. FTC further alleges that Skechers cherry-picked results from the study that they cited and also failed to substantiate anything.
Skechers were defiant, however, and strongly denied the charges. According to them, they only agreed to the settlement in order to avoid “exorbitant cost and endless distraction of several years spent defending multiple lawsuits in multiple courts across the country”.
Its president Michael Greenberg said, “The Company has received overwhelmingly enthusiastic feedback from literally thousands of customers who have tried our toning shoes for themselves and have written unsolicited testimonials about their positive experiences.”
However, instead of defending itself against the lawsuit, Skechers opted for a settlement, which also means that it could avoid admitting anything. On Wednesday, it has agreed to settle the USD 50 million false advertising charges by the FTC and the lawyers of 44 states. Also included in the settlement is the barring of Skechers from misrepresenting any studies, research or studies related to toning shoes.
This settlement marks the FTC’s continuous efforts to stop overhyped marketing claims. Last September, Reebok International also agreed to settle misleading advertisement allegations for USD 25 million when it claimed that its toning shoes strengthen muscles. Skechers is now about to pay twice as much in order to settle FTC claims.
Skechers is the current market leader in the toning footwear industry. The disputed shape-up fitness shoes introduced in 2009 costs around USD 100 a pair while Tone-ups, Resistance Runner and Toners have retail prices from USD 60 to 100 a pair.
Consumers can check ftc.gov/skechers to see if they’re eligible for the settlement and for further instructions on how to claim.

Apr. 6th, 2012


racquathink

Norton Scientific Reviews: Scammers’ Valentine Treat

A global security company issued a scam warning against spam messages with catchy subject lines for Internet users this Valentine’s season.
Users must be extra careful in opening messages in their email accounts especially during the holidays as they can receive spam mails meant to get their attention and steal their personal data.
One such scam warning issued by an antivirus company describes email messages that invites users to buy a gift for his/her loved one for Valentine’s using an attached discount coupon from Groupon.
Even though the proliferation of coupon services is not totally an illegal method, their popularity comes with the risk of being used in phishing attacks.
Phishing can be done by sending a massive amount of email messages asking people to enter their details on a bogus website — one that looks very similar to the popular auction sites, social networking sites and online payment sites. They are designed to obtain personal details like passwords, credit card information, etc.
Through including links in email messages, scammers trick users into visiting malicious sites and online stores, obtaining personal data along the way. Most of the time, the website the link points to is not even connected to the email message but only shows the user promotional content. This is the scammer’s illegal way of earning money called click fraud — they earn for every user they have redirected to a certain website.
There is also scam making the rounds in Germany involving gift coupons, distributed through Facebook, purporting to be from Amazon.
Spywares and malwares are malicious programs that install themselves on a computer unit to record a user’s activity. Eventually, they will send the logs they have collected back to the scammer who plans on pilfering the data for online crimes.
Scammers are freely exploiting different online platforms like Orkut, Myspace, Google+ and Twitter to cast their net on millions of users.
Yet another malicious spam has been spreading on Facebook, and like its predecessors, it makes use of users’ walls to post the fake message.
The post might appear harmless to most users as it only poses an invitation to install a Valentine’s Day theme for their Facebook profile. However, once a user clicks the malicious post, they will be redirected to a different webpage containing the install button.
Clicking install will not do any change to your profile though; worse, it will install a malware file that will show various ads and surveys and download an extension to monitor the user’s online behavior.

Apr. 4th, 2012


racquathink

Blogspot: NORTON SCIENTIFIC SCAM-Detection and Prevention of Clinical Research Fraud - FC2 Knowhow

Scheduled as Needed based on Student Demand. Email us atonlinetrain@nortonaudits.com if you are interested in this course.
Description - This is an advanced-level class that takes an in-depth examination of severe noncompliance, clinical data fabrication and falsification, scientific misconduct and fraud cases. The course focus is on developing skills for preventing fraud and misconduct and preparing clinical research professionals to better handle severe noncompliance.
Class Agenda/Modules - Instructors Make a Difference
Defining Clinical Research Fraud and Misconduct
Evaluation of Case History
R.E.S.E.A.R.C.H. TM Skills Program
Advanced Auditing and Monitoring Skills for Prevention
Case Development
Typical Class Attendee -
Sponsor Auditors
Contract Research Organization Auditors
Clinical Research Associates and Monitors
Institutional Review Board Internal Auditors
Food and Drug Administration Investigators
Independent Consultant Auditors
Compliance Auditors
Experience Level - Advanced; CRC, CRA or Auditor position for two years, preferably with a four year medical or science degree
Class Price - $1500 (10% Southeast Regional Discount and 10% multiple persons from the same organization discounts are available)
NortonCollection -  http://racquathink.livejournal.com/6778.html